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Outreach and Education

Falmouth High School Ceramics Class

October 31, 2018

Falmouth High School students in ceramics teacher Corinne Adams class visited the NEFSC. Lisa Hendrickson of the Population Dynamics Branch led the dissection of inshore longfin squid. The students came via efforts of Grace Simpkins, who works in education and outreach for NEFSC and Woods Hole Sea Grant.

Sandy Hook at 2018 SUBMERGE Marine Science Festival

September 22, 2018


Woods Hole Science Stroll

August 11, 2018

NEFSC's Protected Species Branch at the Woods Hole Science Stroll featured an information table and a life-size inflatable humpback whale.

Galilee Signage Trail -- Point Judith RI

May 18, 2017

From left to right - NEFSC Planning Officer Andy Lipsky, and Acting Chief of the Northeast Cooperative Research Program John Hoey, and commercial fisherman and cooperative research collaborator Captain Rodman Sykes at the Galilee Signage Trail in Point Judith, Rhode Island. Credit: NOAA Fisheries
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Sarah Schumann, President of Eating with the Ecosystem and Galilee Signage Trail partner, speaks to the Galilee Signage Trail audience. Credit: NOAA Fisheries

Yesterday's unveiling of the Galilee Signage Trail in Point Judith, Rhode Island, was a joint effort with Galilee's commercial fishing community and the nonprofit Eating with the Ecosystem, Rhode Island's Department of Environmental Management, and the Town of Narragansett's Galilee Advisory Committee. The signage trail communicates the rich history of the commercial fishing community as well as the economic value and diversity of the region's fisheries to the thousands of yearly visitors of this popular recreational and commercial port. The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Planning Officer Andy Lipsky and Acting Chief of the Northeast Cooperative Research Program John Hoey, and commercial fisherman and cooperative research collaborator Captain Rodman Sykes attended this event to support Galilee's commercial fishing community.


Sea Turtles in Our Backyard - Falmouth MA

April 9, 2017

Lots of hands-on activities were offered at the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event April 9 in Falmouth, MA. Visitors of all ages learned about the different species, measured their carapaces and scanned for PIT tags, piloted an ROV in a small pool, and had a chance to see fishing nets and the gear developed to prevent turtles from getting captured in them.

The event was sponsored by The 300 Committee Land Trust of Falmouth, NOAA 's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and the Northeast Fisheries Science Center.

From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki From the Sea Turtles in Our Backyard event Sunday, April 9, in Falmouth MA. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Shelley Dawicki

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Dr. Jon Hare addresses roundtable in Mashpee MA on March 22, 2017.

Mashpee Roundtable

March 22, 2017

Adapting to the changing climate was the theme for a day-long meeting March 22 attended by NOAA scientists and staff from various line offices and members of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe.

The roundtable, organized by NOAA's North Atlantic Regional Team, was held at the Tribal Community and Government Center in Mashpee and attracted nearly 40 people, including 17 members of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Jon Hare, NEFSC Science and Research Director, spoke about climate impacts on fisheries and John Hoey shared some opportunities in the Cooperative Research Programs; other NOAA offices addressed aquaculture and ocean acidification, and extreme weather preparedness. Members of the Tribe spoke about aboriginal rights and fishing in local and offshore waters. The Tribe is interested in fish and shellfish issues, habitat and water quality, and in bringing traditional ecological knowledge to NOAA partnerships.